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Sarah Brown GB

Thoughts on women, feminism, culture and the media across the globe.
Jun 20 '12
Jun 13 '12

G20 nations - the best and worst ones to be women in!

"Policies that promote gender equality, safeguards against violence and exploitation and access to healthcare make Canada the best place to be a woman among the world’s biggest economies, a global poll of experts showed on Wednesday.

Infanticide, child marriage and slavery make India the worst, the same poll concluded.

Germany, Britain, Australia and France rounded out the top five countries out of the Group of 20 in a perceptions poll of 370 gender specialists conducted by TrustLaw, a legal news service run by Thomson Reuters Foundation.”

Beautifully designed piece of multimedia by the Thomas Reuters Foundation’s Trustlaw Women site, which is well worth a look for interesting blogs and stories from women working in women’s rights across the globe.

And of course, the UK page has a quote from my chief executive at Women’s Resource Centre, which makes it even better!

Jun 12 '12
May 29 '12

Women ‘hold fewer than a third of top jobs’ in UK

Fewer than a third of the UK’s most influential jobs are held by women, figures compiled by BBC News show.

Women occupy on average 30.9% of the most senior positions across 11 key sectors analysed by the BBC, including business, politics and policing, while the armed forces and judiciary have the fewest women in top posts - 1.3% and 13.2% respectively - and secondary education has the most (36.7%):

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-18187449

Apr 30 '12
Apr 27 '12

Senate passes violence against women act

"Sidestepping a politically dangerous fight, Senate Republicans made temporary peace with Democrats to approve the reauthorization of a popular law designed to help prevent and respond to domestic and sexual abuse,” reports the LA Times.

Passage of the Violence Against Women Act on a 68-31 vote gives momentum to the legislation, which would reauthorize more than $650 million in programs. Fifteen Republicans joined Democrats in passage. But the bill still faces hurdles in the House, where Republican leaders plan to offer an alternative proposal.”

Apr 20 '12

Great piece on beat poet Diane de Prima

One of my favourite poets, can’t wait to see this documentary:

http://womensenews.org/story/arts/120412/i-broke-filmmaking-rules-capture-anarchist-poet

Apr 17 '12

New York Times on the impact of cuts to women’s services

wrcwomensnews:

Great to see the New York Times picking up on the story of the impact of the cuts on women’s orgs - Women’s Resource Centre, Eaves, Women’s Aid and Refuge were all quoted in Katrin Bennhold’s excellent piece.

The story, it seems, is going global …. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/18/world/europe/18iht-letter18.html?pagewanted=1&ref=world

Apr 16 '12
onaissues:

All the bylines on today’s Wall Street Journal are women. 
(via emilycsteel’s Instagram)

onaissues:

All the bylines on today’s Wall Street Journal are women. 

(via emilycsteel’s Instagram)

Apr 16 '12
latimes:

In China, foot binding slowly slips into history: In the village of Liuyi, China, there are only about 30 women left who followed a once-common tradition that was painful but also bonded mothers and daughters.

The practice fell out of favor at the turn of the 20th century, viewed as an antiquated and shameful part of imperialist Chinese culture, and was officially banned soon after. But in rural areas, the feet of some young girls were still being bound into the early 1950s. In Liuyi, the practice didn’t stop until around 1957.

Photo: Fu Huiying, 76, shows one of her feet, deformed by foot binding, in Liuyi, a village of about 2,000 people in southern China’s Yunnan province. Credit: Jeffrey Lau / For The Times

latimes:

In China, foot binding slowly slips into history: In the village of Liuyi, China, there are only about 30 women left who followed a once-common tradition that was painful but also bonded mothers and daughters.

The practice fell out of favor at the turn of the 20th century, viewed as an antiquated and shameful part of imperialist Chinese culture, and was officially banned soon after. But in rural areas, the feet of some young girls were still being bound into the early 1950s. In Liuyi, the practice didn’t stop until around 1957.

Photo: Fu Huiying, 76, shows one of her feet, deformed by foot binding, in Liuyi, a village of about 2,000 people in southern China’s Yunnan province. Credit: Jeffrey Lau / For The Times